5 Alarming Things You Must Check Before Choosing The Best Learning Tower For Your Child

(#3 Will Blow Your Mind!)

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New Zealand and Australian safety testing authority research reveals a crucial checklist that all parents, carers and grandparents should read before purchasing a Learning Tower for their child. 

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Shocking Free Check List Below Reveals All!

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FREE CHECK LIST:

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1. Will the Learning Tower tip over with my child in it, is it stable?

2. What weight limit has the Learning Tower been tested to?

3. Are there large gaps in the Learning Tower's walls that my child could fall through or small gaps where they could get their limbs stuck?

4. Are the materials that the Learning Tower is made of safe and compliant?

5. Has the Learning Tower been put through any testing to ensure it will last?

Safety Tested image of the Arc Assistant Learning Tower in White

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What you should check for to answer the above questions:

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1. Will the Learning Tower tip over with my child in it, is it stable?

Did you know that when a child is boosted to stand on a platform at height, they often get excited? This excitement comes out in the form of jumping up and down, rocking or stepping from side to side...

What does this mean for the engineering of my Learning Tower?

Simply put, you need to check if the learning tower has been put through the Tip Over Test 5.24.3 under AS/NZS 8124 /Pt.1/2016.*

When designing the Arc Assistant Original Learning Tower, we put it through numerous rounds of safety testing where we tweaked the design to ensure that this product helps decrease adult stress, boost child development and is MOST IMPORTANTLY safe to use.

This is why the Arc Assistant Original Learning Tower has four protruding feet at its base. Making the design look a little like a rocket ship, these feet along with the sizing and weight of the Arc Assistant Original Learning Tower means it 100% complies with the Tip Over Testing. It was put on a ramp and pulled by machines at different angles and it did not tip. 

Learning Towers without safety feet and compliance with the "Tip Over Test" 5.24.3 within safety standard AS/NZS 8124 /Pt.1/2016 should be queried. 

Learning Tower the Arc Assistant with safety feet

2. What weight limit has the Learning Tower been tested to?

When researching the best learning tower to purchase a crucial fact to know is, to what weight has it been tested to?

To claim that a child product like a seat can hold up to 80kg, three times 80kg, i.e: 240kg must be applied and tested on the product in question, in an accredited laboratory. This is direct from the "Overload test for ride-on toys and seats" 5.24.3 within safety standard AS/NZS 8124 /Pt.1/2016. Only when the child product in question withstands 240kg of weight, can it be stated that the Learning Tower can safely hold up to 80kg.

The Arc Assistant Original Learning Tower, at an IANZ accredited Laboratory in Auckland, New Zealand, had 240kg of weight applied to it and it withstood this. As a result of this testing The Arc Assistant Learning Tower is compliant with the overload testing and can safely hold up to 80kg.

NZ Made Learning Tower the Arc Assistant

3. Are there large gaps in the Learning Tower's walls that my child could fall through or small gaps where they could get their limbs stuck?

Another key question to ask yourself when looking into Learning Towers, is: Does it have large gaps my child could fall through or small holes that my child could get their hands or fingers stuck in?

Children for example when using The Arc Assistant Original Learning Tower, enjoy playing the age old game of peek-a-boo. No matter the progression in technology and the toys available, this is a game that never gets old. If The Arc Assistant was to have large gaps in its four walls, this would be a hazard for the child as when they pop down for their fun game of peek-a-boo their little backs would protrude outside of the learning tower. This means when the child jumps up to appear, they would hit their back on the gap in the learning tower's wall. This is one of the reasons The Arc Assistant Original Learning Tower has durable solid walls with no large gaps.

Another important factor to consider is - are there any holes that my child could use as climbing slots? In order to comply with the safety testing the Arc Assistant Original Learning Tower was designed with "wall plugs" to securely fit into the walls to 'plug' the standing platform holes when not in use. With three standing platform heights the Arc Assistant Original Learning Tower 'grows' with your child, and as you lower the standing platform you plug the higher standing platform holes with the bungs to ensure you have no climbing slots. 

One more question around gaps to consider is, are there any small gaps where my child could get their limbs stuck? Under the safety testing there is a requirement that any small holes (like our two handle holes) at the very top of the right and left walls be of a certain size. This is crucial to check and an important design feature, to ensure that no heads can fit through, whilst at the same time, hands and fingers won't get trapped. For the safety of your child, The Arc Assistant Original Learning Tower's top handles are of the compliant sizing requirements. 

The Arc Assistant Learning Tower Showing no large holes

4. Are the materials that the Learning Tower is made of safe and compliant?

An important question to ask yourself about the Learning Towers you're researching is - are the materials compliant for use in child products? Could my child swallow any of the product parts? What testing has the product been put through, so that I can be confident that the material it is made from is safe for my child to be around?

From Standard AS/NZS 8124 /Pt.1/ 2016 The Arc Assistant Original was tested for and complies with the "Material Quality Test" 4.3.1, and the "Wooden Toys Test" 4.7.3.

Learning Tower with text about the board safety

5. Has the Learning Tower been put through any testing to ensure it will last?

We all know that children can be hard on their things. Not intentionally of course, rather because they're often full of energy, without the understanding of how to care for items yet. There is a great test called the "Reasonably Foreseeable Abuse Test" 5.24, from Standard AS/NZS 8124 /Pt.1/ 2016 The Arc Assistant Original was tested for and complies with. When designing this product we wanted to ensure that it would stand the test of time. 

Throw away products are bad for the environment, which is why The Arc Assistant Original Learning Tower, has been engineered, safety tested and is made in New Zealand to stand the test of time and to 'grow' with your child. 

Summary:

There you have it, 5 key questions to ask yourself when purchasing a learning tower to help support your child's development.

1. Will the Learning Tower tip over with my child in it, is it stable?

2. What weight limit has the Learning Tower been tested to?

3. Are there large gaps in the Learning Tower's walls that my child could fall through or small gaps where they could get their limbs stuck?

4. Are the materials that the Learning Tower is made of safe and compliant?

5. Has the Learning Tower been put through any testing to ensure it will last?

Curated, considered design is crucial when developing child products. Our children in our society are our most vulnerable little people and must be cared for and supplied child friendly products that have been put through the appropriate rigorous testing to ensure that they are safe and worthy of their use. This is why the New Zealand made Arc Assistant Original Learning Tower has been safety tested to such a rigorous degree.

White Arc Assistant Learning Tower, parked at the kitchen bench in white and brown timber kitchen

*Safety Standards Referenced Above:

AS/NZS 8124 /Pt.1/2016 - This joint Australian/New Zealand standard was prepared by joint Technical Committee CS-018, Safety of Children's Toy, It was approved on behalf of the Council of Standards Australia on 20 May 2016 and by the New Zealand Standards Approval Board on 2 June 2016. This standard was published on 30 June 2016.

The following are represented on Committee CS-018:

  • Safekids New Zealand 
  • Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry
  • Australian Competition and Consumer Commission
  • Australian Industry Group
  • Australian Toy Association
  • CHOICE
  • Consumer Affairs Victoria
  • Consumers Federation of Australia
  • Kidsafe
  • Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment New Zealand
  • National Acoustic Laboratories
  • National Retail Association
  • New Zealand Toy Distributors Association
  • NSW Fair Trading
  • Office of Fair Trading, QLD

Purchase Arc Assistant Original Learning Tower here